Why Climate Change Is Real

And Manufactured by Man

Let's look at why climate change is real and manufactured by man. Global experts have been saying this for years. Is anyone listening yet?

There is an overwhelming and alarming scientific consensus that man's activities on Earth manufacture the current climate change.There is an overwhelming and alarming scientific consensus that man's activities on Earth manufacture the current climate change.

Human-produced pollution and waste are causing climate change that is dangerous now and will become much more damaging in the future if we do not act.

That's a powerful statement, but why should you believe it?

This article aims to present the evidence to judge for yourself - but only after you've seen and heard all the evidence and facts.

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Note: This article will take about 12 minutes to read for the average reader. If you would like to select specific areas of interest, please use the jump menu below for more straightforward navigation:



Did You Know?

A staggering 97% of climate scientists agree that climate change is real and driven by human activity. The National Academy of Sciences and every major scientific organisation globally recognise this fact. 

What Is Climate Change?

Climate change refers to natural long-term shifts in global temperatures and weather patterns. However, since the 1800s, human activities have been the primary driver of environmental transformations.The term 'climate change' refers to natural long-term shifts in global temperatures and weather patterns. However, since the 1800s, human activities have been the primary driver of environmental transformations, mainly due to burning fossil fuels such as coal, oil and gas.

Climate change is the intermittent transformation of Earth's atmosphere due to environmental changes and interactions between the atmosphere and other geologic, chemical, biological, and geographic factors within the World system. 

All living things respond to climate changes in the environment, even if these changes are slight and momentary.

What Causes Climate Change?

"The evidence is clear: the main cause of climate change is burning fossil fuels such as oil, gas, and coal. When burnt, fossil fuels release carbon dioxide into the air, causing the planet to heat up." The MET Office

Biological processes, such as fluctuations in the sun's energy, changes in naturally occurring greenhouse gas concentrations and volcanic eruptions, cause changes in the environment's temperature. The Earth's warming and cooling phases in the past occurred naturally and gradually over thousands of years. Over 650,000 years, according to records we have gathered to date. 


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Unnatural Reasons Why Climate Change Is Real

However, since the time of the Industrial Revolution, human activities have released large amounts of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse emissions into the atmosphere. This dangerous activity has changed the Earth's climate rapidly and with devastating consequences. 

Human-produced pollution and waste are causing climate change that is dangerous now and will become much more damaging in the future if we do not act. 

An alarming 97% of climate scientists worldwide agree that climate change is real and driven by human activity. The National Academy of Sciences and other significant scientific organisations globally recognise this fact. 

The National Climate Assessment (NCA) report was developed and written by NOAA, NASA, the Department of Defense and experts at ten other agencies.The National Climate Assessment (NCA) report was developed and written by NOAA, NASA, the Department of Defense and experts at ten other agencies. It was based on the most up-to-date scientific literature and matched the conclusions of thousands of other scientists worldwide.

The report created by the NCA (National Climate Assessment) stated a critical message that the global climate is changing very quickly compared to the pace of natural variations in temperature throughout Earth's history. 

The IPCC Reports on Why Climate Change is Real and Man-Made

The central panel of overall assessment worldwide is the IPCC & established by UNEP and WMO in 1988. The IPCC provides a clear scientific review of global climate change.The central panel of overall assessment worldwide is the IPCC - The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. The IPCC was established by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in 1988. The IPCC provides a clear scientific review of the current state and understanding of global climate change.

The IPCC prepares comprehensive Assessment Reports about the state of scientific, technical and socio-economic knowledge on climate change, its impact on the Earth and future risks, and options for reducing the rate at which climate change is taking place. It also produces Special Reports on topics agreed to by its member governments and Methodology Reports that provide guidelines for preparing greenhouse gas inventories. 

The IPCC is now in its sixth assessment cycle and about to produce the Sixth Assessment Report (AR6) with contributions by its three Working Groups and a Synthesis Report, three Special Reports, plus refinements to its latest Methodology Report.

The IPCC doesn't conduct independent research; instead, it convenes climate experts worldwide every five to seven years to synthesise the latest climate research findings in peer-reviewed and published scientific/technical literature. The IPCC issued comprehensive assessments in 1990, 1995, 2001, 2007 and 2014.

What did the last report reveal?

The Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) is the latest in a series of reports from the IPCC assessing scientific, technical, and socio-economic information regarding climate change. Three instalments were released between 2013 and 2014, and an additional synthesis report was published in November 2014.

More than 830 scientists were involved in writing the reports, and hundreds more reviewed and edited the draft reports.

The IPCC panel concluded that...

"It is extremely likely that human influence has been the dominant cause of the observed warming since the mid-20th century."

Global Average Temperatures

If you average the temperature across land and ocean, the 2020 surface temperature was 1.76° F (0.98° Celsius) warmer than the twentieth-century average of 57.0°F (13.9°C) and 2.14˚F (1.19˚C) and much warmer than the pre-industrial period (1880-1900).

While biological and natural variability will continue to be factors for climate change, most of the differences between present and future climate conditions are defined by our choices today.The next few decades will determine the rate of carbon dioxide emissions and other heat-trapping gases. While biological and natural variability will continue to be factors for climate change, most of the differences between present and future climate conditions are defined by our choices today.

Climate change is real if you look at the global average temperature records. For example, the global average temperature has increased by about 1.8°F from 1901 to 2016. Observational evidence does not support any natural reasons for this amount of warming. Instead, the evidence reliably points to human activities. These dominant cause activities are the emissions of greenhouse or heat-trapping gases.


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Climate Change Indicators

Climate change is real if you look at the 'indicators'. Observed trends in a wide range of physical climate indicators show that Earth is warming. 

Studies have reported melting glaciers and ice sheets, shrinking snow cover and sea ice and other climate variables are indicators consistent with a warmer world.Studies have reported melting glaciers and ice sheets, shrinking snow cover and sea ice, rising sea levels, more frequent high-temperature extremes and heavy precipitation events, and other climate variables are indicators consistent with a warmer world.

While thousands of studies conducted by researchers worldwide have documented increases in temperature at Earth's surface and in the atmosphere and oceans, many other aspects of global climate are also changing.

What Climate Changes Can We See Now?

Many different physical observations track how our climate changes and how we know climate change is real. Indicators include changes in temperature and precipitation levels.

We understand why climate change is real by marking the length of a growing season, the duration of times of drought, the frequency of wildfires, and unprecedented water levels in lakes and streams. Other indicators are the receding Arctic sea ice, snow cover, and alpine glaciers. 

Where Do We Get the Climate Data?

Some of the indicators as to why climate change is real, especially those derived from air temperature and precipitation observations, come from The Blue Hill Weather Observatory, which has virtually continuous data from the late 1800s. 

The Blue Hill Meteorological Observatory is in Massachusetts and is the main structure associated with the history of weather observations in the United States.The Blue Hill Meteorological Observatory, also known as Great Blue Hill Weather Observatory, is in Milton, Massachusetts and is the main structure associated with the history of weather observations in the United States. It maintains an extensive climate record that dates back to 1885, using traditional instruments and observation methods.

The Central England Temperature (CET) record is a meteorological dataset initially published by Professor Gordon Manley in 1953 and subsequently extended and updated in 1974, following many decades of painstaking work. For the Midlands region of England, the monthly mean surface air temperatures are recorded (in degrees Celsius) from the year 1659 to the present day.

The Met Office Hadley Centre in the UK studies scientific issues associated with climate change. Records represent the most extended series of monthly temperature observations globally.The Met Office Hadley Centre — named in honour of George Hadley — is one of the United Kingdom's leading centres to study scientific issues associated with climate change. It is part of and based at the headquarters of the Met Office in Exeter. The CET record represents the most extended series of monthly temperature observations globally and is a valuable dataset for meteorologists and climate scientists.
CET and its 10-year and 30-year moving averages (orange and black traces, respectively)CET and its 10-year and 30-year moving averages (orange and black traces, respectively)

CET - 10 year and 30 year moving averages

The temperature data recorded at Hadley revealed some compelling trends. 


During the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, a cool period coincided with cool winters and generally cool summers, but the temperatures fluctuated widely with no trend. From 1910, temperatures increased until 1950, when they flattened before a sharply rising trend started around 1975, with the warmest decade on record being the 2010s (2011–2020), with a mean temperature of 10.40 °C (50.72 °F). 


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Examples of Why Climate Change is Real and Made By Man

The general warming trend is attributed to human-caused climate changes. Each indicator shows shifts in that particular variable, yet taken as a whole, in the context of the Earth's complete climate system. The cumulative changes documented by each indicator show a compelling and consistent picture of a warming world. 

For example, Arctic sea ice has declined since the late 1970s. Most glaciers have retreated, the frost-free season has lengthened, heavy precipitation events have increased globally, and the sea level has risen. These indicators and many more are changing in ways consistent with a warming climate.

Fossil-fuel burning produces particles and well-known greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide.Fossil-fuel burning produces particles and well-known greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide. Atmospheric aerosols consist of tiny particles of solids, like dust, and liquids, like water, suspended in the atmosphere. Cars, aeroplanes, power plants, and industrial processes all have particles that can collect in the atmosphere.

According to a recent article by Carbon Brief, scientists think that 100% of global warming is due to humans.

In summary, the IPCC report finds that:

  • Since 1850, almost all the long-term warming is from greenhouse gas emissions and other human activities.
  • If greenhouse gas emissions alone were warming the planet, we would expect to see about a third more warming. They are offset by cooling from human-produced atmospheric aerosols.
  • Aerosols will decline significantly by 2100, bringing total warming from all factors closer to warming from greenhouse gases alone.
  • Natural variability in the Earth's climate is unlikely to play a significant role in long-term warming.

In its 2013 fifth assessment report, the IPCC stated for policymakers that it is:

"extremely likely that more than half of the observed increase in global average surface temperature from 1951 to 2010 was caused by human activity."

Meaning a 95% to 100% probability that more than half of modern warming was due to humans.


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Ancient Evidence as to Why Climate Change is Real

Ancient evidence found in tree rings, ocean sediments, coral reefs, and layers of sedimentary rocks proves that climate change is real and caused by human activity.

Ancient paleoclimate evidence reveals that current warming is occurring roughly ten times faster than the average rate of ice-age-recovery warming.Ancient paleoclimate evidence reveals that current warming is occurring roughly ten times faster than the average rate of ice-age-recovery warming. Carbon dioxide from human activity increases more than 250 times faster than it did from natural sources after the last Ice Age.

Evidence from Our Oceans Why Climate Change is Real

Gavin Schmidt, director of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Goddard Institute for Space Studies, said scientists look at many different things. However, if you look at the ocean temperatures, you get an accurate picture of what is happening.

"We have a very, very clear understanding that the amount of heat in the ocean is increasing, and the ocean heat content is going up by a lot."

Gavin Schmidt - National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Goddard Institute for Space Studies.

That implies that there must be an external change in the Earth's radiation budget. In other words, more energy has to be going in than leaving.

"There are several ways that can happen, but each has a different fingerprint. If the sun were brighter, we would see warming all the way up through the atmosphere from the surface to the stratosphere to the mesosphere. We don't see this. We see instead warming at the surface, cooling in the stratosphere, cooling in the mesosphere. And that's a signature of greenhouse gas forcing. It's not a signature of solar forcing. So we know it's not solar."

Evidence from Fossil Fuel Emissions Why Climate Change is Real

Scientists can also distinguish between CO2 molecules emitted naturally by plants and animals and those resulting from fossil fuel burning. Carbon molecules from different sources have different numbers of neutrons in their nuclei; these different versions of molecules are called isotopes.

Plants contain the radioactive isotope carbon-14, which decays over time. Geological materials like coal, oil, and natural gas are so old that they no longer have carbon-14.Plants contain the radioactive isotope carbon-14, which decays over time. Geological materials like coal, oil, and natural gas are so old that they no longer have carbon-14. So scientists can measure precisely how much carbon in the atmosphere today comes from fossil fuels by studying the isotopes, protons and neutrons.

Carbon isotopes derived from burning fossil fuels and deforestation are lighter than those from other sources. Scientists measuring carbon in the atmosphere can see that lighter carbon molecules increase, corresponding to the rise in fossil fuel emissions.

"We can't get away with saying that humans are not responsible for the carbon that's been added to the atmosphere. The isotopes don't lie, and they show it."

James Powell of the National Physical Sciences Consortium.

Other Ways Scientists Prove Why Climate Change is Real

Evidence from sediments taken from the ocean floor, ice cores, tree rings, sedimentary rocks, and coral reefs show that the current global warming rate is ten times more than when the Earth emerged from the last ice age.

To understand this rapid change in global temperature, scientists looked at information sets and data-driven climate models to try to reproduce the changes that have already been observed. And, when scientists input only natural phenomena such as the sun's intensity, changes in the Earth's orbit and ocean circulation, the models could not reproduce the changes in phenomena that we see today.

Peter de Menocal, dean of science at Columbia University and founding director of Columbia's Centre for Climate and Life.Peter de Menocal, dean of science at Columbia University and founding director of Columbia's Centre for Climate and Life.

"We have independent evidence that says when you put in greenhouse gases, you get the changes that we see," said Schmidt. "If you don't put in greenhouse gases, you don't. And if you put in all the other things people think about - the changes in the Earth's orbit, the ocean circulation changes, El Niño, land-use changes, air pollution, smog, ozone depletion—all of those things, none of them actually produce the changes that we see in multiple data sets across multiple areas of the system, all of which have been independently replicated." In other words, only when the emissions from human activity are included are the models and data sets able to accurately reproduce the warming in the ocean and the atmosphere that is occurring. Today, almost 100 per cent [plus or minus 20 per cent] of the unusual warmth that we've experienced in the last decade is due to greenhouse gas emissions." 


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We Know Why Climate Change is Real, So What Do We Do Now?

Okay, we can say that we know why climate change is real. But what can we do about it? 

Many different associations, organisations, governments, and forums have their theories, but we can all agree that whatever we do, we need to do it now.

"Use your voice, use your vote, use your choice." - Al Gore

"Using your voice as a consumer, a customer, a member of the electorate, and an active citizen will lead to changes on a much grander scale." - The Grantham Institute

9 Things You Can Do About Climate Change - from The Grantham Institute

These are the nine most powerful things you can do right now to help reduce climate-related global catastrophes from happening now and in the future.These are the nine most powerful things you can do right now to help reduce climate-related global catastrophes from happening now and in the future.
  1. Make your voice heard by those in power.
  2. Eat less meat and dairy.
  3. Cut back on plane flights.
  4. Leave the car at home.
  5. Reduce your energy use and bills. 
  6. Respect and protect green spaces.
  7. Invest your money responsibly.
  8. Cut consumption and waste.
  9. Talk about the changes you make.

To read these in more detail, visit The Imperial College London...


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Greenpeace Knows Why Climate Change is Real

Greenpeace Knows Why Climate Change is Real

Greenpeace has a similar message. They know that it is easy to feel overwhelmed and that climate change is too significant to solve. Massive international cooperation between governments and businesses, including the most polluting industry sectors, is needed quickly for solutions to work. 

Individuals can also make more good selections about where they get their energy, how they travel, and what they consume. But the most acceptable way for anyone to help stop climate change is to take cooperative action. This action means pressuring governments and corporations to change their policies, current business practices and future strategies for growth to allow for more sustainable procedures.

Governments want to be re-elected. And businesses can't survive without customers. Demanding action from them is a powerful way to make change happen.


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10 Ways to Get the Government & Businesses to Stop Climate Change

The best way for anyone to help stop climate change is to take collective action.Individuals can also play a part by making better choices about where they get their energy, how they travel, and what food they eat. But the best way for anyone to help stop climate change is to take collective action. This means pressuring governments and corporations to change their policies and business practices.

The ten main ways to stop climate change, according to Greenpeace, are to pressure the government and businesses to:

  1. Keep fossil fuels in the ground. Fossil fuels include coal, oil and gas – and the more that are extracted and burned, the worse climate change will get. All countries need to move their economies away from fossil fuels as soon as possible.
  2. Invest in renewable energy. Changing our primary energy sources to clean and renewable energy is the best way to stop using fossil fuels. These include solar, wind, wave, tidal, and geothermal power technologies.
  3. Switch to sustainable transport. Petrol and diesel vehicles, planes and ships use fossil fuels. Reducing car use, switching to electric cars, and minimising plane travel will help stop climate change and reduce air pollution.
  4. Keep homes insulated and warm. Homes shouldn't be draughty and cold. It's a waste of money and makes life miserable in the winter. The government can help households heat our homes in a green way – such as by insulating walls and roofs and switching away from oil or gas boilers to heat pumps.
  5. Improve farming and encourage vegan diets. Businesses and food retailers can improve farming practices and provide more plant-based products to help people make the shift. One of the best ways for individuals to help stop climate change is by reducing their meat and dairy consumption or going fully vegan.
  6. Restore nature to absorb more carbon. The natural World is very good at cleaning up our emissions, but we need to look after it. Planting trees in the right places or giving land back to nature through 'rewilding' schemes is an excellent place to start. Photosynthesising plants draw down carbon dioxide as they grow, locking it away in soils.
  7. Protect forests like the Amazon. Forests are crucial in the fight against climate change, and protecting them is an essential climate solution. Cutting down forests on an industrial scale destroys giant trees, which could be sucking up vast amounts of carbon. Yet companies destroy forests to make way for animal farming, soya or palm oil plantations. Governments can stop them by making better laws.
  8. Protect the oceans. Oceans also absorb large amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, which helps to keep our climate stable. But many are overfished, used for oil and gas drilling or threatened by deep-sea mining. Protecting oceans and their life is ultimately a way to protect ourselves from climate change.
  9. Reduce how much people consume. Our transport, fashion, food and other lifestyle choices impact the climate. Fashion and technology companies, for example, will release far more products than are realistically needed. But while reducing the consumption of these products might be hard, it's most certainly worth it. Reducing overall consumption in more wealthy countries can help put less strain on the planet.
  10. Reduce plastic. Plastic is produced from oil, and extracting, refining, and burning oil into plastic (or even polyester, for clothing) is surprisingly carbon-intense. Because it doesn't break down quickly in nature, much of the plastic we produce is burned, contributing to carbon emissions. The demand for plastic is rising so fast that creating and disposing of plastics will account for 17% of the global carbon budget by 2050 (this is the emissions count we need to stay within according to the Paris agreement).

To read the Greenpeace article in full, please visit their website here... 


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